The real Bookseller of Kabul says he, and his country, are misunderstood

The real Bookseller of Kabul says he, and his country, are

The real Bookseller of Kabul says he, and his country, are misunderstood The real Bookseller of Kabul says he, and his country, are misunderstood. By Laura King, Kabul 28 February 2009 — 12

The Bookseller of Kabul by Åsne Seierstad

The Bookseller of Kabul is a non-fiction book written by Norwegian journalist Åsne Seierstad, about a bookseller, Shah Muhammad Rais (whose name was changed to Sultan Khan), and his family in Kabul, Afghanistan, published in Norwegian in 2002 and English in 2003.

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The Bookseller of Kabul responds – latimes

Feb 25, 2009 · Though critically well-received, it did not approach the blockbuster status of «The Bookseller of Kabul.» Rais, too, has embarked on a new chapter. His family is widely scattered now, his first wife and three children in Canada, the second wife and two other children in Oslo.

The Kabul bookseller, the famous reporter, and a

The Bookseller of Kabul has sold more than half a million copies in Scandinavia alone. It has been sold to publishers in 17 countries and came out to rave reviews in Britain last month.

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The Bookseller of Kabul – Hunterdon County Library

Provoking controversy almost from publication, The Bookseller of Kabul is a compelling portrait of an Afghan bookseller, a local hero who risked his life to save the literary heritage of his country and publicly argued for women’s rights and liberal ideals. But, in the course of the book,

The Bookseller of Kabul | Essay Example

The Bookseller of Kabul Essay Sample This paper is a book report on “The Bookseller of Kabul” by Asne Seierstad. This is the true story of a journalist, (the author), who lived with a family in Afghanistan after the fall of the Taliban.

The Bookseller of Kabul – Wikipedia

Following global critical acclaim, many of the book’s descriptions were contested by Rais, whose first wife Suraia sued the author in Norway for defamation. On July 24, 2010, Seierstad was found guilty of defamation and “negligent journalistic practices and ordered to pay damages to Suraia Rais, wife of Shah Muhammad Rais”.

Author: Åsne Seierstad

The Bookseller of Kabul author cleared of invading Afghan

Suraia Rais, the second wife of the real-life bookseller, whom he married, according to the book, when she was a girl of 16, filed the complaint against Seierstad.

The Bookseller of Kabul tells his version – The Mercury News

KABUL, Afghanistan — There’s one bookstore where you’ll never, ever find a copy of “The Bookseller of Kabul.” That would be the Bookseller’s.

The Bookseller of Kabul — A Complex Portrait of Afghan

He used the time in prison to immerse himself in the culture and history of his country by reading books smuggled in by his family. During the 1992 attacks on Kabul by the Mujahadeen, Khan took his …

The Bookseller of Kabul awaits plot’s end with unease

He wanted to learn about the people who have done so much to change his country, and to do some business as well. He had an invite from the University of California in Los Angeles.

The War at Home – The New York Times

Dec 21, 2003 · He wants damages and a cut of the profits from »The Bookseller of Kabul,» which became an international best seller (and the most successful nonfiction book in Norway’s history).

The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad, Ingrid

The Bookseller of Kabul is startling in its intimacy and its details To say nothing means to give one’s consent. The agreement was drawn up, the date fixed. Sultan went home to inform his family of the news. His wife, the real Kabul book seller that Seierstad depicted in her book eventually filed lawsuit to block its publication

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Bookseller of Kabul v. Journalist of Oslo; A Host Is

Oct 29, 2003 · For almost a year after Asne Seierstad, a Norwegian journalist, published »The Bookseller of Kabul,» her unblinking account of the inner workings of …

Was I cruel and arrogant? Perhaps – Telegraph

Nov 30, 2004 · Her book, The Bookseller of Kabul, is an intimate warts-and-all description of daily life in a prosperous Kabul household just after the fall of the Taliban, an event that Seierstad was covering